Concrete

Concrete is a material that has a bit of a bland reputation, but in all fairness it isn’t difficult to see why. Sturdy and grey, concrete has an association with urban monotony which causes a number of homeowners to disregard it as boring and ugly without much thought.

However, concrete is a lot more colourful than it appears. As a material it is now heavily customisable, with different finishes and pigmentations that can suit pretty much anyone’s personal palette. One of concrete’s biggest advantages, however, is its high thermal mass. In layman’s terms, this means that it can absorb a great deal of heat energy without experiencing any major fluctuations in temperature.

Concrete

The real potential of concrete as a building material is exhibited by the beautiful ‘Tiny House’, which is not only almost entirely made out of concrete but also contains very few other decorative design elements. The concrete walls, floors and ceilings are all completely exposed, giving the property a strong minimalist ambience that is sure to appeal to fans of alternative architecture.

Tiny House was one of the first projects from young architect Aranza de Arino. Located close to the beautiful surfing town of Puerto Escondido, Mexico, its design offers a unique and surprisingly economic alternative to the expensive air conditioning that the area’s climate would often force visitors to rely on. Being almost entirely made of concrete, the house will remain cool during the sweltering daytime heat.

Concrete
Concrete

Of course, that’s not the only way to keep cool at the Tiny House. The rear of the property features its own swimming pool and outdoor shower, while to the front we can see that the concrete table from inside the house extends straight outwards, giving visitors a perfect spot to enjoy the outdoors.

Other than concrete, the main material used in the construction of the Tiny House is a native timber called parota wood. This darkly coloured wood is a less dense alternative to most tropical hardwoods, and makes up most of the property’s furniture, windows shutters and doors.

Inside the minimalist elements extend beyond the architecture and decorations. The kitchen-dining area has only a small electric hob and a sink with, of course, a concrete basin. The property also features, surprisingly, two bathrooms, one of which is open plan on a mezzanine floor. We can also see a slim pair of alternating concrete staircases leading up to the first floor, where visitors can relax at the end of the day with a gorgeous view of the rolling lush landscape.

Concrete
Concrete

Photo credit: Camila Cossio