Hexagon House

A highly functional eco home which featured on Grand Designs has just gone on sale.

The ‘Hexagon House’ made its debut in 2007 as part of the show's seventh season. It was built single handedly by owner and local carpenter Kelly Neville, who always dreamed of creating such a house.

Hexagon House

Located in Little Downham in Cambridgeshire, the Hexagon House has a number of features designed to make it as environmentally friendly as possible. Hot water is supplied by solar panels, while rainwater is harvested to be used in the washing machine and WC. The house also utilises an air source heat pump, which heats air from the outside to be used for underfloor heating.

Having been built for just £110,000, it has just gone on sale for a whopping £665,000 with estate agents Cheffins.

Hexagon House

“The property has been constructed using an oak timber frame with straw bale insulation with the roof being cedar shingles,” the advertisement reads. “The exterior has been lime rendered and the interior a mixture of clay and lime plaster.”

The name of the four bedroom property comes from its odd hexagonal shape, which has resulted in an interesting internal layout. The inside features a group kitchen, dining and living area with a high vaulted ceiling, as well as an 800 year old tree trunk staircase leading up to the next floor. 

Hexagon House

The upstairs bathroom features a unique glass bathtub, which has been integrated with sculptural bog oak. The nearby glass wash basin sits on top of an attractive wash stand which opens into the property’s main laundry chute.

There is also plenty to appreciate outside: sitting on six acres, the Hexagon House offers its own fruit tree orchard, along with beautiful lawned gardens featuring 1200 mixed hedgerow plants and over 2000 varieties of willow. The outside also feature a vegetable patch, as well as a private pond with shingle banks.

Hexagon House

Closer in, the house features beautiful timber decking, complete with a walkway to the front of the property. The water for the garden is processed through a reed bed beneath the property, which also serves as an eco-friendly drainage solution.

Despite being eco-friendly, the house also offers plenty of parking space: the gravelled driveway leads up to an attractive oak framed cart lodge with space for two cars and an adjoining closed store.

Hexagon House

While the house might seem to be in the middle of nowhere, it actually has quite an attractive location. It sits in the village of Little Downham, which offers its own nursery and primary school as well as shops and sports facilities. 

Better yet, the village is just two miles from Ely, where you can catch a mainline train that will have you at King’s Cross station in just an hour and ten minutes!