Flying house

Choosing to integrate your lifestyle into your property design can lead to some magnificent architecture. New angles like this allow us to look at property and home improvement in a different way, giving us the chance to create something truly unique.

Here we have the 'Flying House', a home owned by a young pilot close to Incheon airport in South Korea. The architect, HyoMan Kim, and his design team chose to mix the characteristics of the pilot's lifestyle with traditional Korean architecture: just take a look at the property's pure white Korean pavilion and say it doesn't conjure the image of an airplane in flight.

Flying house
Flying house

The traditional elements of the property are practical as well as symbolic. The project was undertaken on a low budget, and so the designers turned to less expensive materials and methods for constructing and maintaining the house. For example, the ground floor is heated using an 'ondel', an old Korean stone heating system.

Money saving choices can also be seen elsewhere. The concrete used to build the Flying House was left intentionally uncovered, though this creates a simple urban style that many will find appealing.

One of the most noticeable features of the house is the greenery that covers it. The different rooftop gardens are connected via sloped paths which allow the turf to stretch seamlessly over multiple levels. 

As well as bringing some much needed colour to the property, this also has an impact on its role in the surrounding landscape. The location is up and coming, and will likely see a great deal of development over the next few years. By combining the shape of the property with greenery in this way, the designers of the 'Flying House' have made it a feature of the surrounding landscape, helping to keep the area connected to nature.

Flying house
Flying house

The Flying House features three bedrooms, with the master bedroom coming paired its own master bath. Still, the property was designed with family in mind. The two children's bedrooms are each paired with a small child's study, and the sunken space in the living room provides an cosy spot to relax and keep warm.

While the property is certainly stunning, the white plasticity of the architecture may put some more in the mind of a student campus than a family home. Still, the refreshing fusion of old, new and flowing greenery makes the property a welcome oasis in the drab surrounding landscape.

Flying house
Flying house
Flying house
Flying house